Archive for October, 2008

NAME-DAY = ONOMASTICO

Friday, October 31st, 2008

The Name-Day is more important than a birthday in Italy and many other countries. Since Italy is almost entirely catholic, generally all Italian names come from the name of a saint from the Bible. Since every day a saint was born every day we celebrate a saint, on that day would be your Onomastico if you have the same name. 

Not all names have a saint so  November 1st, all Saints Day , is the day for the rest of the people that do not have a name of a saint to celebrate.

The most famous name-day is Saint Joseph, and because Saint Joseph was Jesus father. That day is also father’s day in Italy.

My saint is Saint Carlo Borromeo and he was born on November 4th…………so Buon Onomastico to me and

for the others….Buon Onomastico tomorrow!

ONOMASTICO

Friday, October 31st, 2008

IL 4 NOVEMBRE E’ IL MIO ONOMASTICO E COME AL SOLITO SOLO I MIEI FAMIGLIARI, CHE ANCORA VIVONO, MI CHIAMERANNO PER FARMI GLI AUGURI MA QUI’ NON SANNO NEANCHE CHE COSA SIA.

DOPO 40′ANNI DOVREI ESSERCI ABITUATA MA NON E’ COSI’, PERCIO’ INVITERO’ AMICI A CASA E CERCHERO’ DI FESTEGGIARE SENZA PARLARNE.

QUANTI DI VOI HANNO RINUNCIATO A FESTEGGIARE L’ONOMASTICO?

HALLOWEEN – Halloween cames to America

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

As European immigrants came to America, they brought their varied Halloween customs with them. Because of the rigid Protestant belief systems that characterized early New England, celebration of Halloween in colonial times was extremely limited there.

It was much more common in Maryland and the southern colonies. As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups, as well as the American Indians, meshed, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included “play parties,” public events held to celebrate the harvest, where neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other’s fortunes, dance, and sing. Colonial Halloween festivities also featured the telling of ghost stories and mischief-making of all kinds. By the middle of the nineteenth century, annual autumn festivities were common, but Halloween was not yet celebrated everywhere in the country.

 

In the second half of the nineteenth century, America was flooded with new immigrants. These new immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing Ireland’s potato famine of 1846, helped to popularize the celebration of Halloween nationally. Taking from Irish and English traditions, Americans began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today’s “trick-or-treat” tradition. Young women believed that, on Halloween, they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings, or mirrors.

 

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-together, than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft.

At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day.

By the 1920s, Halloween had become a secular, but community-centered holiday. Despite the best efforts of many communities and schools vandalism began to plague Halloween celebrations.

By 1950s,town leaders had successfully limited vandalism.

Between1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived.

A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6.9 billion annually on Halloween. 

 

 

 

Mortgage

Monday, October 13th, 2008

Despite all the negative press and media coverage lately, we still have plenty of banks ready and willing to lend money for purchasing or refinancing residential and commercial real estate. In fact there are still “stated income” loans available for loan amounts of up to $3,000,000! The rules are somewhat more strict, but none the less the banks are willing to lend.